Thoughts On Memoir and Angles of Repose

Finding the angle of repose, that easy place where story flows is no easy task. First, pour your heart out on the page until a pile forms— sufficient text for a memoir, say. (Example: if the memoir has 360 pages, write M=360) Using a life span and brutal honesty, measure the amount of truth versusContinue reading “Thoughts On Memoir and Angles of Repose”

Essay is Live at Blue Lyra Review

“The words a father speaks to his children in the privacy of the home are not overheard at the time, but, as in whispering galleries, they will be clearly heard at the end and by posterity.” -Jean Paul Richter, writer (1763-1825)   I am happy to announce that my short nonfiction essay, Death Comes Calling,Continue reading “Essay is Live at Blue Lyra Review”

Write About What You Know (or, not)

 Write about what you know. That’s the advice we’ve all been given. On the surface this seems obvious, even trite, but I now know writing about what I don’t know can be vastly more intriguing and rewarding. About a year ago, I posted a blog entry about my Uncle Elliott, who was killed in theContinue reading “Write About What You Know (or, not)”

Quack! Quack!

My book review of Moby-Duck: The True Story of 28,800 bath Toys Lost at Sea and of the Beachcombers, Oceanographers, Environmentalists, and Fools, including the Author, Who Went in Search of Them by Donovan Hohn is live at The Internet Review of Books. I loved this book. Aside from the title, which has to be oneContinue reading “Quack! Quack!”

Seven Wheelchairs: A Life Beyond Polio

Gary Presley took his last physical steps in 1959 when he was only seventeen. He contracted Polio from the Salk vaccine. It’s ironic that he got it from the last in the series of immunizations meant to protect him from the very disease he contracted and it happened the very year that the Sabin vaccine,Continue reading “Seven Wheelchairs: A Life Beyond Polio”